As we learned over the weekend, Robert Pattinson has reportedly been cast in a major motion picture to be directed by William Malone. The project is called Lost In Paris and finds Pattinson playing the role of a WWII veteran named Henry Costin who travels to Paris as part of a peacekeeping mission. After his plane is shot down over enemy territory, Costin finds himself in enemy hands where he eventually meets a beautiful young French woman (played by Lea Seydoux) who he falls in love with. The actress portraying the role of Costin’s wife is yet to be cast.

Pattinson’s Choice

While we await more details about the movie, let’s take a trip down memory lane and revisit one of the actor’s most memorable performances. In 2012, Lost In Paris was among the first films to be released to theaters across the country as part of a limited engagement that screened the Oscar-nominated film The Artist. Based on the 1907 novella by Jerome K. Jerome, the black-and-white silent comedy finds Pattinson portraying Henry Costin, an Englishman who agrees to go to Paris as part of a peacemaking initiative. There he becomes entangled in one romantic entanglement after another. The role ultimately helped Pattinson earn his first Academy Award nomination in 2013 for Best Actor. The actor lost out to his Twilight co-star and close friend, Robert Downey Jr., for the part of Ironman in the 2014 film Ironman 3.

The Film’s Influences

When it comes to film influences, it’s mostly hearsay at this point, but Lost In Paris is said to be loosely based on the 1927 classic The Jazz Singer. The story follows a struggling singer who ends up in the big city and becomes accidentally embroiled in a series of romantic entanglements. The film’s most obvious inspiration, The Jazz Singer, was among the first digital features ever released to theaters, and it helped define the look and feel of early talkies. Another significant influence behind Lost In Paris is the 1936 comedy The Great Ziegfeld. Directed by William A. Seiter, the film centers on George M. Cohan, who was at the time the most successful actor-producer-composer in American history. The movie is named after Ziegfeld, the legendary impresario of the 20s, who was one of the first to recognize Cohan’s talents and bring him on as a creative consultant. The role was a springboard for Cohan’s lifelong passion for theater, and he performed in nearly every one of Ziegfeld’s shows during the 1920s and 1930s.

A Return To The Classics

While many of today’s blockbusters try to be as realistic as possible, back in the day, movie magic and special effects were used to make monsters and dinosaurs come to life. This is still the case with classic films such as King Kong, which first hit theaters in 1933 and was originally designed to be played largely by animals. Even older films like Ben-Hur, which debuted in 1906, are incredibly faithful to the originals and wouldn’t feel out of place on the big screen today.

What Will The Fans Say?

This brings us to an important question: What do the fans say? Let’s take a trip down memory lane and revisit one of the most highly regarded films ever made, The Artist. Based on the 2011 novel by Andre Aciman, the film explores the literary aspirations of an aspiring novelist who moves to Paris to pursue his dream. The movie is widely considered to be one of the best French films ever made, and it won the coveted Palme d’Or at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. While there, the film won the Award for Best Actor and Best Score at the 2012 Telluride Film Festival and the 2012 Venice Film Festival, respectively. It also won the 2012 New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor (Michel Hazanavicius) and the 2012 BAFTA Award for Best Film (Michel Hazanavicius). All of this should come as no surprise to fans of The Artist, as it largely follows the trajectory of its illustrious protagonist, Georges, who finds himself accidentally caught up in a whirlwind of seduction and misadventure.

A Film That’s Inspired By Literature

The Artist is often credited with introducing the concept of the literary artist in cinema. While many of today’s blockbusters try to be as realistic as possible, back in the day, movie magic and special effects were used to make monsters and dinosaurs come to life. This is still the case with classic films such as King Kong, which first hit theaters in 1933 and was originally designed to be played largely by animals. Even older films like Ben-Hur, which debuted in 1906, are incredibly faithful to the originals and wouldn’t feel out of place on the big screen today.

Lost In Paris is said to be loosely based on the 1927 classic The Jazz Singer. The story follows a struggling singer who ends up in the big city and becomes accidentally embroiled in a series of romantic entanglements. The film’s most obvious inspiration, The Jazz Singer, was among the first digital features ever released to theaters, and it helped define the look and feel of early talkies. Another significant influence behind Lost In Paris is the 1936 comedy The Great Ziegfeld. Directed by William A. Seiter, the film centers on George M. Cohan, who was at the time the most successful actor-producer-composer in American history. The movie is named after Ziegfeld, the legendary impresario of the 20s, who was one of the first to recognize Cohan’s talents and bring him on as a creative consultant. The role was a springboard for Cohan’s lifelong passion for theater, and he performed in nearly every one of Ziegfeld’s shows during the 1920s and 1930s.