Richest actor in the world, famous for his movie-star looks and intense on-screen chemistry with his costars, may have just landed himself a brand new role. According to reports, the 33-year-old actor has closed a deal to play the lead role of James Bond in a film adaptation of the classic spy drama. If true, this would be yet another huge coup for Pattinson, who is already well-known for playing iconic characters such as Edward Cullen in the Twilight series and the cursed King Richard III in The History of Richard III.

The Scottish actor has racked up a whopping 14 acting awards since his professional acting debut in the 2003 mini-series Outlander. He is most recently known for his role as drug lord Harry Jekyll in the upcoming Netflix series The Dark Tower, based on the Stephen King novel of the same name. He has also been starring in the Hunger Games film series as Repina Mullick, a role that earned him a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor nomination in 2015.

The Last Five Years

Since its premiere in 2012, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1 has dominated the box office, becoming the highest-grossing film of all time with $764 million worldwide. The fourth and final installment in the vampire saga, Breaking Dawn – Part 2, dropped just 42% in its second weekend to push the four-part series past the $1 billion mark globally. With another $80.8 million in its third weekend, the final installment now holds the record for the biggest three-day weekend in history, surpassing both The Avengers ($80.8 million) and Toy Story 3 ($75.8 million).

But for all of its cinematic glory, The Twilight Saga was not without controversy. The first part of the series was dogged by accusations of cultural appropriation, with the franchise’s author, Stephenie Meyer, once stating that she felt like a “white woman in a black dress” while writing the story. Most notably, the 2016 Broadway musical adaptation of Twilight, with music and lyrics by Sara Bareilles and a book by Julie Taymor, was met with scathing reviews and closed after just seven performances.

Saving Mr. Banks

While most of Hollywood was still recovering from the shock of The Twilight Saga’s unprecedented $764 million opening weekend, another historic moment was unfolding far away from the silver screen. The film industry had been celebrating the 50th anniversary of the cinematic classic Mr. Banks’ Family Tree for weeks, but on December 8, 2016, the finally-approved adaptation of the legendary Vivian Vance novel, starring Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks, was unleashed on theaters around the world.

The film was, until that point, the biggest budget Warner Bros. had ever attempted (approximately $30 million). The studio had to scale back its ambitions after Mr. Banks underperformed at the box office, pulling in just $18.7 million in its opening weekend. In comparison, Thompson’s other 2016 release, The Happy Prince, earned $30.2 million in its opening weekend and went on to become a major summer blockbuster, grossing over $500 million worldwide. While Thompson received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her role in Mr. Banks, the film only earned her a Golden Globe nomination, losing out to Lady Gaga for her performance in Jojo Rabbit.

Avengers: Endgame

While most of Hollywood was still recovering from the shock of The Twilight Saga’s unprecedented $764 million opening weekend, another historic moment was unfolding far away from the silver screen. The film industry had been celebrating the 50th anniversary of the cinematic classic Mr. Banks’ Family Tree for weeks, but on December 8, 2016, the finally-approved adaptation of the legendary Vivian Vance novel, starring Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks, was unleashed on theaters around the world.

The film was, until that point, the biggest budget Warner Bros. had ever attempted (approximately $30 million). The studio had to scale back its ambitions after Mr. Banks underperformed at the box office, pulling in just $18.7 million in its opening weekend. In comparison, Thompson’s other 2016 release, The Happy Prince, earned $30.2 million in its opening weekend and went on to become a major summer blockbuster, grossing over $500 million worldwide.

La La Land

Following the critical and commercial success of his previous collaborations with Damien Chazelle, including Whiplash and the musical drama La La Land, Damien Chazelle was set to release his most ambitious project yet. The director had been working on the film, titled First Man, for over four years and finally premiered at the Venice Film Festival in August 2018. Starring Ryan Gosling and Corey Stoll, the film follows Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the Moon, as he pursues his dream of becoming an astronaut, despite having to overcome his own personal challenges and those he encounters along the way.

The film was met with rave reviews and became Chazelle’s biggest commercial hit to date, earning over $100 million at the box office. But it was far from a one-hit-wonder. Critics praised Gosling’s performance and the film’s rich score, with Variety writing: “It may not reinvent the wheel of what a first-person account of outer space exploration on the surface of the Moon might look like. But it does what it sets out to do with breathtaking effectiveness, not to mention stunning visuals.”

Dark Phoenix

Following the critical and commercial success of his previous collaborations with Damien Chazelle, including Whiplash and the musical drama La La Land, Damien Chazelle was set to release his most ambitious project yet. The director had been working on the film, titled First Man, for over four years and finally premiered at the Venice Film Festival in August 2018. Starring Ryan Gosling and Corey Stoll, the film follows Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the Moon, as he pursues his dream of becoming an astronaut, despite having to overcome his own personal challenges and those he encounters along the way.

The film was met with rave reviews and became Chazelle’s biggest commercial hit to date, earning over $100 million at the box office. But it was far from a one-hit-wonder. Critics praised Gosling’s performance and the film’s rich score, with Variety writing: “It may not reinvent the wheel of what a first-person account of outer space exploration on the surface of the Moon might look like. But it does what it sets out to do with breathtaking effectiveness, not to mention stunning visuals.”

Trolls

While most of Hollywood was still recovering from the shock of The Twilight Saga’s unprecedented $764 million opening weekend, another historic moment was unfolding far away from the silver screen. The film industry had been celebrating the 50th anniversary of the cinematic classic Mr. Banks’ Family Tree for weeks, but on December 8, 2016, the finally-approved adaptation of the legendary Vivian Vance novel, starring Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks, was unleashed on theaters around the world.

The film was, until that point, the biggest budget Warner Bros. had ever attempted (approximately $30 million). The studio had to scale back its ambitions after Mr. Banks underperformed at the box office, pulling in just $18.7 million in its opening weekend. In comparison, Thompson’s other 2016 release, The Happy Prince, earned $30.2 million in its opening weekend and went on to become a major summer blockbuster, grossing over $500 million worldwide.

Kumwaay

Following the critical and commercial success of his previous collaborations with Damien Chazzelle, including Whiplash and the musical drama La La Land, Damien Chazzelle was set to release his most ambitious project yet. The director had been working on the film, titled First Man, for over four years and finally premiered at the Venice Film Festival in August 2018. Starring Ryan Gosling and Corey Stoll, the film follows Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the Moon, as he pursues his dream of becoming an astronaut, despite having to overcome his own personal challenges and those he encounters along the way.

The film was met with rave reviews and became Chazzelle’s biggest commercial hit to date, earning over $100 million at the box office. But it was far from a one-hit-wonder. Critics praised Gosling’s performance and the film’s rich score, with Variety writing: “It may not reinvent the wheel of what a first-person account of outer space exploration on the surface of the Moon might look like. But it does what it sets out to do with breathtaking effectiveness, not to mention stunning visuals.”