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Offensive Humour Can Hurt Someone’s Heart

Sometimes one person thinks that something is funny, but another person feels the same thing is unacceptable and offensive. Because of this, it is essential that you are careful about what you say and the type of joke you might want to tell other people.

Have you ever been in a group of people when someone tells a joke that not everyone laughs about? It can be very uncomfortable, especially if you look at the face of the person or people who are not laughing. they might not say anything in response, but their body language leaves little doubt that they did not appreciate the joke. Following are some things are you, as a business person, are likely best to avoid joking about:

Ethnicity

This is one of the most sensitive areas as most jokes are very degrading and disrespectful of the group that is being talked about. Several slang … Read More

The New California Privacy Law that Could Affect Every U.S Business

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It’s not the first time you hear about data breaches – you probably have listened to lots of them. For example, in 2018, Facebook went against the law of 50 million accounts. The largest social platform didn’t stop there. In 2019, they made a record of 540 million, which was exposed by Amazon servers.

And the worst is that data exploitation isn’t just affecting specific industries – it’s affecting tons of other industries. For example, over 106 million Capital One customers were affected when hackers gained access to their sensitive information in the United States and Canada. The same happened to Equifax when over 147 million American citizens were affected.

With this increasing rate of breaches, a study by the Pew Research Center has found out that close to 49 percent of American citizens now admit that their personal information is no longer safe as compared to the past five … Read More

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer… Read More

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer… Read More

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer… Read More